Holly Levitz RN, BSN,CSN
High School Nurse
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Dana Grzywna LPN
Grade School
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Health Room/Screening Information

The following forms are required annually in each of the following grades:

ALL students:    * Annual Student Medical History Update

Kindergarten, 6th, and 11th grades:    Physical Examination

Kindergarten, 3rd, and 7th grades:      * Dental Examination

Kindergarten and all new students:   * All immunization records  (see “immunization requirements” tab to left)

     

Vision Screening

The School Health Act requires that each child of school age be given a vision test annually by a school nurse.  In testing vision, eye doctors employ a time-honored reference to measure visual acuity. The Snellen chart or the Titmus Vision Tester, with progressively smaller letters, has become almost universal. “20/20” means that the person being tested can see the same letters on the chart, viewed from 20 feet, as a theoretically normal eye can see from 20 feet. “20/80” means the eye sees at 20 feet what a normal eye sees at 80 feet.

In kindergarten through Grade 3, the standard of failure for near vision or far vision is inability to read 3 out of 5 or 4 out of 7 symbols on the 20/40 line with either eye.  In Grades 4-12, the standard of failure is inability to read the same number of symbols on the 20/30 line with either eye.  A child who fails the visual acuity test should have a professional eye examination by an eye doctor.

Hearing Screening

The major goal of hearing screening is to locate children with hearing impairments.  Results of hearing screening programs have shown that from 5% -10% of the school population do not pass the hearing test.  The majority of these children are in need of medical treatment.  Such treatment may result in restoration of hearing and prevention of permanent hearing impairment.  Listening and talking are so much a part of us that we very seldom consider the implications of not being able to hear.  The most serious effect of a hearing loss is the interference with communications between people.  In a child some of the consequences may be:

  • Interference with normal speech and language development
  • Development of abnormal social growth and behavior
  • Interference with education

Each year all students in kindergarten, and grades 1,2,3,7,and 11 are given a hearing screening test.  Parents and guardians of students who fail the test are notified by mail so that follow up with a professional can be accomplished.

Body Mass Index

Body mass index (BMI) is measure of body fat based on height and weight.  BMI has been shown to be a reliable indicator of total body fat, which is related to the risk of disease and death.  The score is valid for males and females, however, it does have some limitations.  The limitations are:

  • It may overestimate body fat in athletes and others who have a muscular build.
  • It may underestimate body fat in people who have lost muscle mass.

BMI scores are rated as follows:

  • < 18.5 indicates your child may be underweight
  • 18.5 24.9 indicates a healthy weight range
  • 25 26 indicates your child is slightly overweight
  • 27 29 indicates your child is mildly obese
  • > 30 indicates severe obesity

For people who are considered obese (BMI greater than or equal to 30) or those who are overweight (BMI of 25 to 29.9) and have two or more risk factors, the guidelines recommend weight loss. Risk factors include:

  • Physical inactivity
  • Cigarette smoking
  • High blood sugar
  • High blood pressure
  • High LDL cholesterol
  • Low HDL cholesterol

Even a small weight loss (just 10 percent of your current weight) will help to lower your risk of developing diseases associated with obesity.  For those who have less than two risk factors it may be important to maintain your weight rather than loosing weight.

Body Mass Index Percentile

Body mass index percentile is used to also determine a childs health.  The percentile ratings indicate that a child is:

  • overweight if they have a BMI over the 95th percentile for their age
  • at risk of becoming overweight if they have a BMI between the 85th and 95th percentile for their age
  • underweight if they have a BMI under the 5th percentile for their age

A child has a healthy BMI if it is between the 5th and 85th percentile.

Immunization Requirements for Students

Children entering 7th grade need the following:
  • 1 dose of tetanus, diphtheria, accellular pertussis (Tdap)
  • 1 dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV)

On the first day of 7th grade, unless the child has a medical or religious/philosophical exemption, a child must have had the above vaccines or risk exclusion.

Children entering 12th grade need the following:
  • 1 dose of MCV on the first day of 12th grade.  If one dose was given at 16 years of age or older, that shall count as the twelfth grade dose.
On the first day of 12th grade, unless the child has a medical or religious/philosophical exemption, a child must have had the above vaccines or risk exclusion.
In addition children in all grades need the following:
  •  4 doses of tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis* (1 dose on or after the 4th birthday)
  • 4 doses of polio (4th dose on or after 4th birthday and at least 6 months after previous dose given)**
  • 2 doses of measles, mumps, rubella***
  • 3 doses of hepatitis B
  • 2 doses of varicella (chickenpox) vaccine or evidence of immunity
*Usually given as DTP or DTap or if medically advisable, DT or Td
** A fourth dose is not necessary if the third dose was administered at age 4 years or older and at least 6 months after the previous dose
*** Usually given as MMR

ON THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL, unless the child has a medical or religious/philosophical exemption, a child must have had at least one dose of the above vaccinations  or risk exclusion.

• If a child does not have all the doses listed above, needs addition­al doses, and the next dose is medically appropriate, the child must receive that dose within the first five days of school or risk exclu­sion. If the next dose is not the final dose of the series, the child must also provide a medical plan (red and white card) within the first five days of school for obtaining the required immunizations or risk exclusion.

•  If a child does not have all the doses listed above, needs addition­al doses, and the next dose is not medically appropriate, the child must provide a medical plan (red and white card) within the first five days of school for obtaining the required immunizations or risk exclusion.

•  The medical plan must be followed or risk exclusion.

When To Stay Home

In order for your child to be able to learn and to control communicable diseases in the school it is important to keep your child home for the following reasons:

  • Temperature of 100 degrees or more.  Your child should be fever free (without Tylenol or Motrin) for 24 hours before returning to school.
  • If your child vomited or had diarrhea during the previous evening or night, please keep them home.
  • Strep throat your child must be on an antibiotic for 24 hours before returning to school.
  • Swollen, red eyes that itch and are draining your child must be on an antibiotic for 24 hours before returning to school for bacterial conjunctivitis and drainage free and/or a note from the doctor.
  • Moist, productive cough, chest congestion, or discolored nasal discharge.  However, for a mild runny/stuffy nose and mild cough it is alright to send your child to school.
  • An unusual rash, a blistery rash, or a rash associated with a fever.  Your child should remain at home until you have discussed the rash with your physician.
  • Live head lice.  Child should stay home until treated for head lice.

Concussion Information

Concussion is a common injury in teenagers. If your child has a concussion or you suspect your child has a concussion, see your child’s primary medical provider. Students with concussions need special follow-up in school.

If your child is diagnosed with a concussion, contact the Certified Nurse:

Ms. Levitz at the High School at hlevitz@k12pacs.org or 215-673-3990.

Ms. Grzywna at the Grade School at dgrzywna@k12pacs.org or 215-676-8320.

Student Medication Policy

Prescription and non-prescription medications can be administered during the school day by the school nurse with the following regulations:

*A doctor’s signature either on the district form or on a prescription pad from the doctor

*A parent signature requesting that the medication be given at school

*An original prescription bottle with the students name and the name of the medication

*If an over-the- counter medication, the original container with the students name written in clear, legible writing

*If the medication is a controlled substance, such as Ritalin, a parent must bring the medication into school, otherwise the student may bring it to the nurse as soon as the student arrives to school

*Over the counter medications may be given IF the parent signs the Medication Consent form (found on “health forms to download tab”)

Health Forms to Download

School Health forms are an important part of providing a safe and supportive school experience for your children.  Please send in your child’s Annual Student Medical History Form at the start of each school year to allow us time to address health concerns and put plans in place for your child’s health.

The following forms are required annually in each of the following grades:

ALL students:    * Annual Student Medical History Update

Kindergarten, 6th, and 11th grades:    Physical Examination

Kindergarten, 3rd, and 7th grades:      * Dental Examination

Kindergarten and all new students:   * All immunization records  (see “immunization requirements” tab to left)

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